Phase Four: Restoring Safe Services

July 21 - Phase Four: Restoring Safe Services
Phase Four Town Hall Recording

Phases One through Four of Restoring Safe Services: Manitoba’s Pandemic and Economic Roadmap for Recovery set out evidence-based plans to ease public health measures put in place to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

The success of the measures introduced earlier this year is making it possible to restore services safely in phases. This phased approach has been working.

Many factors including current research and the experience of other jurisdictions all contribute to the decisions recommended by public health professionals on whether further restrictions are required, or further easing is possible.

Phase 4 Implementation

As a result of public health evidence and advice, and in response to feedback received, phase four will proceed but with some items deferred to a later date or moved forward with more limited implementation. Other steps will remain as proposed.

The proposed changes to visits in personal care homes and long-term care settings will proceed as outlined in the draft document. Facility operators will continue to review visitation policies and processes to ensure appropriate visitation, along with the health and safety of residents and families.

Items moving forward with limited implementation on July 25 include:

  • maintaining current site capacity at 30 per cent (instead of the proposed 50 per cent) for faith-based services and pow wows, but eliminating the need for sub-groups (cohorts);
  • allowing stage performances and opening movie theatres to a maximum capacity of 30 per cent of the site (instead of the proposed 50 per cent), up to a maximum of 500 people;
  • allowing casinos to open at a maximum of 30 per cent of the site’s capacity (instead of the proposed 50 per cent); and
  • allowing retail businesses and indoor recreation sites to use non-permeable barriers when distances of two metres can not be maintained.

The following proposed changes have been deferred at this time:

  • proposed changes to indoor and outdoor gathering sizes;
  • relaxing of self-isolation requirements for those travelling from eastern and southern Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada; and
  • walk-up counter service in bars, beverage rooms, brew pubs, microbreweries and distilleries.

Public health officials will review possible adjustments on a week-by-week basis and make any additional changes based on the public health situation at the time.

To view the updated phase four plan and to review public health guidance for businesses, visit www.manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.


This information is available in an alternate format upon request, please contact engagemb@gov.mb.ca.

July 21 - Phase Four: Restoring Safe Services
Phase Four Town Hall Recording

Phases One through Four of Restoring Safe Services: Manitoba’s Pandemic and Economic Roadmap for Recovery set out evidence-based plans to ease public health measures put in place to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

The success of the measures introduced earlier this year is making it possible to restore services safely in phases. This phased approach has been working.

Many factors including current research and the experience of other jurisdictions all contribute to the decisions recommended by public health professionals on whether further restrictions are required, or further easing is possible.

Phase 4 Implementation

As a result of public health evidence and advice, and in response to feedback received, phase four will proceed but with some items deferred to a later date or moved forward with more limited implementation. Other steps will remain as proposed.

The proposed changes to visits in personal care homes and long-term care settings will proceed as outlined in the draft document. Facility operators will continue to review visitation policies and processes to ensure appropriate visitation, along with the health and safety of residents and families.

Items moving forward with limited implementation on July 25 include:

  • maintaining current site capacity at 30 per cent (instead of the proposed 50 per cent) for faith-based services and pow wows, but eliminating the need for sub-groups (cohorts);
  • allowing stage performances and opening movie theatres to a maximum capacity of 30 per cent of the site (instead of the proposed 50 per cent), up to a maximum of 500 people;
  • allowing casinos to open at a maximum of 30 per cent of the site’s capacity (instead of the proposed 50 per cent); and
  • allowing retail businesses and indoor recreation sites to use non-permeable barriers when distances of two metres can not be maintained.

The following proposed changes have been deferred at this time:

  • proposed changes to indoor and outdoor gathering sizes;
  • relaxing of self-isolation requirements for those travelling from eastern and southern Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada; and
  • walk-up counter service in bars, beverage rooms, brew pubs, microbreweries and distilleries.

Public health officials will review possible adjustments on a week-by-week basis and make any additional changes based on the public health situation at the time.

To view the updated phase four plan and to review public health guidance for businesses, visit www.manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.


This information is available in an alternate format upon request, please contact engagemb@gov.mb.ca.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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  • Are parades allowed?

    CJansen asked over 1 year ago

    At this time parades must follow the regulations in place for all public gatherings. Public gatherings may have up to 100 people at an outdoor space. More people are allowed, provided that groups can be physically divided into sub-groups of 100 or fewer. Each sub-group must be able to arrive, depart and participate in the gathering without co-mingling with members from any other sub-group. Adequate physical distancing must continue to be provided for all participants. If there are food vendors, they must follow the relevant restrictions in place. Additional guidelines for those hosting events can be found at: https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.

  • I live in a condo building that has a shared gym. It has been closed since the start of the pandemic and I'm wondering what are the regulations in place for private gyms? When I had inquired with the property manager a couple months ago, I was told that according to the COVID-19 regulations set by the province, only gyms that are supervised can re-open. Is this the same for gyms in condo buildings?

    bradycraddock asked over 1 year ago

    Condominiums are considered businesses under the public health orders. Amenities may reopen if they follow the same regulations for businesses that offer those services. Gyms must implement measures to ensure that members of the public are reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from other members of the public. Gyms must also limit the number people present to 50% of the usual occupancy of the premises or one person per 10 square metres, whichever is lower. There does not need to be an attendant present if the intent of the public health orders can be met through other means. 

    Public health officials have provided a number ways for gyms to further decrease their risk of COVID-19 transmission. This information can be found at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.

  • What are the specific guidelines for outdoor rinks?

    Laine Wilson asked over 1 year ago

    All outdoor sport or recreational facilities, including rinks, may operate at normal capacity outdoors if the organization implements measures to ensure that members of the public are reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from others, except for brief exchanges.

    Additional guidelines for outdoor sport or recreational facilities can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/phase-two.html#collapse10. 

    The province has developed guidance that will help participants and organizers consider the risks associated with recreational activities in Manitoba during the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides examples of strategies that may be implemented to reduce potential risks. Each sport or recreational facility must establish a plan to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission between participants and spectators. Guidelines including the risk assessment and mitigation tool can be found online at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/sports-guidelines.html.

    Organizations are responsible for their own plan and to ensure activities are in compliance with the public health orders. At this time the province will not be approving plans. If organizations have questions specific to health guidance around modifications they can contact AskHealth at https://forms.gov.mb.ca/Ask_Health.

  • If our wedding is at a golf course, and we are holding the occasional liquor service permit, are we able to have a dance floor as long as physical distancing practices are in effect? Additionally, if the capacity is 250, and we keep groups separate and smaller than 50, can we have 75 people there? (30% of 250).

    Bride 20 asked over 1 year ago

    For events held at venues that do not hold a liquor service license issued under The Liquor, Gaming and Cannabis Control Act, provincial public health officials are advising against the use of dance floors and dancing as it is difficult to maintain physical distancing. If dancing does occur, the occupancy on the dance floor should be limited to ensure those dancing together can reasonably maintain a distance of two metres. 

    Larger indoor group sizes at public gatherings such as weddings are allowed where distinct groups of 50 or less can be physically separated to prevent contact with other groups. This includes the members of the wedding party, who must remain in one sub-group for the duration of the event without co-mingling with members of other groups. The total number of attendees must not exceed 30% of the usual capacity of the space where the event is being held. Each sub-group must be able to arrive, depart and participate in the event without co-mingling with members from any other sub-group. Throughout the event, all attendees must be reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from others, except for brief exchanges.

    Additional guidance for public gatherings can be found at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/phase-three.html#collapse1, and information for hosting events such as weddings can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/celebrations-ceremonies-guidelines.html

  • For a wedding or gathering that is being held at a large indoor venue where the usual capacity limit is 250 people, are you required to have a guest list of no more than 50 or does the 30% capacity rule apply and allow you to have a guest list of 75 in this case (30% of 250 being 75)? What is the distinction between organized gatherings where the limit is 50 people indoors vs a limit of 30% capacity?

    2020 Bride asked over 1 year ago

    At this time public gatherings such as weddings are allowed a maximum of 50 people indoors. Attendees must be reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from others, except for brief exchanges. 

    However, larger group sizes are allowed where distinct groups of 50 can be physically separated to prevent contact with other groups. In this situation, the total number of attendees must not exceed 30% of the usual capacity of the space where the event is being held. Each sub-group must be able to arrive, depart and participate in the event without co-mingling with members from any other sub-group. This includes the members of the wedding party, who must also remain in one sub-group for the duration of the event without co-mingling with members of other groups. Adequate physical distancing must continue to be provided for all attendees.

    Additional guidance for public gatherings can be found at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/phase-three.html#collapse1, and information for hosting events such as weddings can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/celebrations-ceremonies-guidelines.html

  • What are the guidelines regarding childcare during study groups which are held in a church in Winnipeg? For example, during a 2 hour bible study can the babies and toddlers be cared for in the nursery?

    Ele asked over 1 year ago

    Study groups at churches must follow the conditions for public gatherings. All people present, including children and infants, count towards the total number of people at the gathering. However, if children are being cared for in a separate space from where the gathering is taking place they would not count towards the number of people at the gathering.

    Child care centres may open to their regular licensed capacity and provide care to children in accordance with The Community Child Care Standards Act. Consideration should be given to the use of communal space and drop off and pick up of children using staggered schedules and/or separate entrances/exits.

    Additional information on public gatherings and child care can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.

  • Under the guidelines for faith-based gatherings, what specifically would be defined as a faith-based gathering? Does that relate specifically to weekly worship services? Or does it also include church meetings as well as study group meetings held at the church facility? For a church located in PMH does the gathering for non-worship services become restricted to 10? Additionally, does the wearing of masks reduce the risk of transmission from congregational singing as it is currently listed as high-risk?

    andrlo asked over 1 year ago

    The public health orders distinguish between public gatherings and religious services with different conditions in place for each. Under the current public health orders for Prairie Mountain Health region, churches and other places of worship may open to hold regular religious services if the number of persons attending a service does not exceed 30% of the usual capacity of the premises or 500 persons, whichever is lower, and measures are implemented to ensure that persons attending a service are reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from other persons at the service, other than a group of persons who are attending the service together.

    If other gatherings, such as study group or church meetings, are held at a place of worship attendance must be limited to 10 people and masks must be worn, in accordance with the applicable requirements for an indoor public gathering. 

    Wearing a mask is a tool that, in addition to practising public health fundamentals, may help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others, especially in indoor public spaces if physical distancing cannot be maintained. Wearing a mask alone will not stop the spread of COVID-19. While nothing in the public health orders restricts singing during worship gatherings, public health officials are strongly discouraging singing in large groups due to singing posing a higher risk of transmission than speaking. In addition, large choirs should not be held at this time. Infected people may transmit the virus over greater distances through their saliva or respiratory droplets while singing and when playing certain instruments such as wind or brass instruments. The number of vocalists and instrumentalists should be limited to soloists or small groups. It is also recommended that places of worship discourage congregational singing and chanting. At this time it is recommended that congregants hum along to the vocalist, instrumentalist or pre-recorded music and continue to follow the guidelines for places of worship as well as for vocalists. 

  • Is there specific protocols or regulation for in-person board or staff meetings?

    Dan Murphy asked over 1 year ago

    Business meetings are not considered public gatherings and there is no occupancy limit. However, if a meeting is open to the public, public gathering limits must be followed. It is recommended that staff attending the meeting can maintain a two metre physical distance from others. Guidance for businesses can be found online at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/guidance.html

    Additionally, food service at meetings must follow the guidelines for restaurants/food service, which can be found at https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html.

  • The following question is on behalf of a small local church group in Winnipeg. The church would like to take a group of approximately 30 junior high and high school age children for a one or two overnight stay on a secluded family owned private property. Currently Manitoba health orders state "No overnight camps will be permitted in the foreseeable future." Does overnight stays on a private property fall under the restriction of overnight camps referenced in the public health order? Or is the intent of the public health for accredited camps within Manitoba?

    RoPe asked over 1 year ago

    Overnight camps for children are not permitted at this time. This applies to accredited camps as well as other organized groups such as church groups.

  • Hi! Are there any changes in restrictions for gyms? For example can change rooms be opened, water fountains be used & drop ins allowed?

    Tracey Tallaire asked over 1 year ago

    There are no changes to the guidelines and restrictions for gyms at this time. Conditions outlined in earlier phases continue to apply. Additional information for the fitness industry can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/restoring/index.html. As this is an evolving situation, we encourage you to stay up to date. Updates to information on COVID-19 in Manitoba can be found at https://manitoba.ca/covid19/.