Accessibility for Manitobans Act

Accessibility for Manitobans Act

New - What We Heard Report

The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) sets out a path to remove, reduce, and prevent barriers through the development of accessibility standards in five fundamental areas of daily living. The AMA calls for a review of the effectiveness of accessibility standards every five years.

The Accessibility Advisory Council wants to hear from Manitobans about their experience with the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service, including what is working well and what needs improvement. The goal of the Standard is to ensure businesses/organizations provide customer service in a way that allows people with disabilities to benefit from the same service, in the same place and in the same way or in a way similar to how others receive service. Learn more about the Five-Year Review of the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service.

Provide Your Feedback

Whether the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service removes barriers you face, or requires you to remove barriers for others, we want your feedback. There are many ways you can participate:

Take the Survey

Sign Up for a Webinar

Share Your Story


If you need assistance or would prefer to provide your comments by talking to someone, please call the Manitoba Accessibility Office (formerly the Disabilities Issues Office), which acts as secretary to the Council:

Accessibility Advisory Council
c/o Manitoba Accessibility Office
Email: MAO@gov.mb.ca
Phone: 204-945-7613 (in Winnipeg) or toll free: 1-800-282-8069 (ext. 7613)

Alternate formats and accommodations to participate are available by request.

Accessibility for Manitobans Act

New - What We Heard Report

The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) sets out a path to remove, reduce, and prevent barriers through the development of accessibility standards in five fundamental areas of daily living. The AMA calls for a review of the effectiveness of accessibility standards every five years.

The Accessibility Advisory Council wants to hear from Manitobans about their experience with the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service, including what is working well and what needs improvement. The goal of the Standard is to ensure businesses/organizations provide customer service in a way that allows people with disabilities to benefit from the same service, in the same place and in the same way or in a way similar to how others receive service. Learn more about the Five-Year Review of the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service.

Provide Your Feedback

Whether the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service removes barriers you face, or requires you to remove barriers for others, we want your feedback. There are many ways you can participate:

Take the Survey

Sign Up for a Webinar

Share Your Story


If you need assistance or would prefer to provide your comments by talking to someone, please call the Manitoba Accessibility Office (formerly the Disabilities Issues Office), which acts as secretary to the Council:

Accessibility Advisory Council
c/o Manitoba Accessibility Office
Email: MAO@gov.mb.ca
Phone: 204-945-7613 (in Winnipeg) or toll free: 1-800-282-8069 (ext. 7613)

Alternate formats and accommodations to participate are available by request.

Share Your Story

Share a story about the customer service you received while visiting a business/organization.

  • Were you able to benefit from the same services, in the same place and in the same way or in a way similar to how others received services? 
  • What went well and what could have improved the experience?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people with disabilities, persons with long-term health conditions or illness, seniors, caregivers, family, friends and natural supports, and others interested in this area.

We kindly ask that you do not name specific businesses or organizations in your comments.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
CLOSED: This engagement is now closed.

  • Functionning member of society, yet not part of it in its entity.

    by Ginette Remillard , about 1 year ago
    My husband has Becker's muscular dystrophy. His condition is worsening and he is in a wheelchair. He is a wonderful son, brother, husband, father, computer programmer and a longtime contributing member of society.


    It is frustrating when many barriers treat him as second class citizen, yet he pays his taxes.

    When we go out, he can't always get in through the front door as there is no proper accessibility into a building or venue. At times, the elevator needs a special key or someone to operate, leaving him waiting behind or having to get the run around of excuses. Also... Continue reading

  • Seperate lines for people w/ disabilities

    by Nikki.C, about 1 year ago
    My condition is not visible. I look perfectly healthy on the outside, but I am severely disabled. My entire autonomic nervous system does not function when I stand upright. (Breathing, heart rate, digestion, blood pressure, body temp, sweat, blood circulation, etc) I cannot stand in lines, and cannot walk for long periods of time. It would help if businesses had queues for people with disabilities who cannot stand up for long periods of time, or wait in lines. Covid has made it impossible for me to shop in any grocery store, or any retail store whatsoever. I would faint waiting... Continue reading
  • I do things for a reason

    by ElaineS, about 1 year ago

    I have struggled with walking my entire adult life, but I have also fought to maintain my independence. I love to travel, but I have learned that I have to do things a certain way so that I can travel. I always prebook a window seat so that I don’t have to get up and down for people beside me, I am never late for boarding so that I can get on the plane in the preboarding so I can sit down and not have to get up until the plane lands.


    I was flying to visit my daughter when... Continue reading

  • hearing technology

    by grayrlsc, about 1 year ago

    With more people using the phone to place orders due to the virus we need to make sure that both ends of the call understand each other and that the business makes sure what they are selling is what the customer wants with regards to quality, size, & price.

  • Pandemic Life Every Day

    by Centurion, about 1 year ago
    My son is severely disabled with many medical conditions. We have taken care of him on our own for 30 years now. Suffice to say people in general do not care a lick for families like ours. Individuals do -yes but laws are not going to change the terrible attitudes of society in general. The government needs to play a much larger role, setting the example. Instead they continue to encourage disabled people to hide in nursing homes where, of course, they will die and no longer be a problem to have to face, Help us get out in the... Continue reading
  • Communication Accessibility

    by Ntuck, about 1 year ago
    I am a CODA- Child of Deaf Adults; meaning a hearing child of Deaf parents (who use ASL).

    I have interpreted all of my life for my parents and those who do not know ASL. Interpreting is not only for the Deaf people it is for the hearing people who do not know ASL -it goes both ways.

    Airlines, hospitals, medical clinics, gov't agencies, stores, restaurants etc.. All assume everyone is hearing and speaking in their approach to providing services.

    Change of mindset, some people require other forms of communication so provide all avenues: auditory and visual and tactile (I... Continue reading

  • Crying in a parking lot

    by HLaw, about 1 year ago

    Our son has a very rare disorder and has global delays; he uses a wheelchair for mobility. He loves to eat at restaurants. We have tried to go to a local place three times - twice we ate in but not without having to ask for a manager to assist - the manager didn’t come talk to us nor did it make the visit any more welcoming on their behalf, but twice we actually got a table. The place has had a couple of incarnations since a chain moved out. There is a ramp to get in - the main... Continue reading