Granite

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Granite is a light-colored igneous rock, typically made of mineral grains large enough to be visible with the naked eye. This rock forms from the slow cooling of large pockets of magma below the surface of the earth. Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar, but can also contain minerals like micas and amphiboles. The rock is often found in a variety of shades of pink, orange, beige and grey.

Photo of Granite taken at Northern Indian Lake.Northern Indian Lake

Photo of Granite taken at Southern Indian Lake.Southern Indian Lake

Photo of Granite taken at Pinawa dam site.Pinawa dam site


Where is it found?

Granite is very common across Manitoba, in places where the Canadian Shield is exposed at the surface. The Chipewyan batholith, located in northern Manitoba, is the largest known granite body in the province. It is a single body of rock spanning from Manitoba into Saskatchewan and extends for over 900 kilometres! The Lac du Bonnet area is famous for its granite and features some of the best rock exposures of classic pink granite in the province. Many roads in the Lac du Bonnet area cut directly through the pink granite. Uses for the area’s granite include in construction and as decorative building stone. Other uses include kitchen countertops, monuments or garden decorative accessories. The amazing rosy colour of the granite around Lac du Bonnet has earned it the name ‘Canadian Mist’ granite, a rock which is popular and in demand across Canada.

Photo of Granite taken at Northern Indian Lake.Northern Indian Lake

Photo of a polished slab of ‘Canadian Mist’ granite from the Lac du Bonnet area.Polished slab of Canadian Mist granite.
Lac du Bonnet area.

Photo of Granite taken at Knight Lake.Knight Lake

Back to EngageMB Rocks

Granite is a light-colored igneous rock, typically made of mineral grains large enough to be visible with the naked eye. This rock forms from the slow cooling of large pockets of magma below the surface of the earth. Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar, but can also contain minerals like micas and amphiboles. The rock is often found in a variety of shades of pink, orange, beige and grey.

Photo of Granite taken at Northern Indian Lake.Northern Indian Lake

Photo of Granite taken at Southern Indian Lake.Southern Indian Lake

Photo of Granite taken at Pinawa dam site.Pinawa dam site


Where is it found?

Granite is very common across Manitoba, in places where the Canadian Shield is exposed at the surface. The Chipewyan batholith, located in northern Manitoba, is the largest known granite body in the province. It is a single body of rock spanning from Manitoba into Saskatchewan and extends for over 900 kilometres! The Lac du Bonnet area is famous for its granite and features some of the best rock exposures of classic pink granite in the province. Many roads in the Lac du Bonnet area cut directly through the pink granite. Uses for the area’s granite include in construction and as decorative building stone. Other uses include kitchen countertops, monuments or garden decorative accessories. The amazing rosy colour of the granite around Lac du Bonnet has earned it the name ‘Canadian Mist’ granite, a rock which is popular and in demand across Canada.

Photo of Granite taken at Northern Indian Lake.Northern Indian Lake

Photo of a polished slab of ‘Canadian Mist’ granite from the Lac du Bonnet area.Polished slab of Canadian Mist granite.
Lac du Bonnet area.

Photo of Granite taken at Knight Lake.Knight Lake